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Tuesday, October 17, 2006

Checking your web app against different browser resolutions

    I have found three basic methods:
  1. Use an online type of viewer.
    You select the resolution, type in the URL of your site, then sit back and relax.
      I see a lot of problems for this method:
    • you don't want everybody to know you are working on a site

    • you don't want the site to be open to the public while you work on it

    • you need an internet connection


  2. Use an external program.
    BrowserSizer is as good as any. It's free and easy to use. You select the resolution and it resizes your IE window accordingly.
    The only problem I see is that you need the program. You install it, it messes with your browser settings, etc.

  3. Use a javascript script in the IE addressbar:
    javascript:db=document.body;bst=db.style.zoom=1;rd=prompt("Width:",800);
    db.style.zoom=db.offsetWidth/rd;void('')

    Unfortunately, the zoom messes up quite a few things, including fixed table headers or custom javascript controls. However, I do believe it is the best solution for most situations.

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