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Sunday, March 22, 2009

Battlestar Galactica ended in EPIC FAIL!

The finale of what seemed to become my favourite sci-fi series ever (at its beginning) left me with a bitter taste in my mouth. Not only it makes no sense, but it is overall incredibly idiotic. If you haven't watched the end of the series, don't read further, because this is the mother of all ranty spoilers ever.

What makes it so emotional for me is not only that I really liked the show, but that this was not a show that was ended because of lack of planning or budget or the economical crisis, so nothing was rushed or changed. This was "meant to happen". And it sucked! Sucked worse that a vampire caught in the event horizon of a black hole that is falling into another black hole!

Not only did it not explain anything in a manner that would make sense to me, but instead it went completely overboard on all the things that I hated in the show. God exists, he somehow planned all this (oh, yeah, real modesty here, mr. Moore!), the model 6 in Gaiuses head was an angel, so was Kara Thrace, in the end they all reach Earth (this Earth) and decide to leave all technology behind (they throw the ships in the sun!!!) in the hope that starting anew would make them "break the cycle" and Hera became the chromosomal mother of all future humans. I guess leaving all that technology behind wasn't a good survival strategy for the rest of the 38000 people left alive, was it?!

If everything was God's plan, then there was no cycle except in its brain!! Forgetting mistakes is NOT a step towards not repeating them. Leaving behind technology is just as stupid! And ending the show with a couple of angels walking on Earth now and making bets on if we repeat the mistakes again or not, with background videos of the latest developments in robotics was.... there is no word in the English language for it. It is dumber than creationist! And the last half of the last episode was all about people saying goodbye to one another then going to live alone (read DIE!!) somewhere!

There is a glimmer of hope left though. The centurions were given their freedom and the last baseship. I will be looking at the sky hoping for them to return, nuke Moore and then air an all Cylon TV show about how they didn't repeat any mistake and just carried on!! Gods, this was frakking retarded!

And, of course, there is one more good thing in the series, and that is the Bear McCreary's remix of Bob Dylan's/Jimmi Hendrix's All Along the Watchtower. I am embedding the video with the cool transition from simple piano to all the instruments. Pretty cool!.

Guess what? F***ing YouTube removed the video because of a copyright infringement. What? One minute and a half of a movie scene? Geez! Couldn't find the same scene, so I am embedding All Along The Watchtower.

The sound bit of the scene, sans the scene, can be found here. You can also see the live performance of the song here. You might also want to try Bob Dylan's original song.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

love your blog and i agree.

Many on this blog are upset BSG used religion, gods, and angels to explain away the questions we had on a
series we spent over 4 years watching. I bought into BSG because I thought it was true science fiction; dark, dangerous, cutting edge and not some Harry Potter like fantasy. The shaky handheld camera rarely veered into brightly lit rooms. The show was as much about eluding raw emotions from the characters as it was about great complex storytelling.

Since there is no homogeneous definition of science fiction, some can argue its truth. I feel my personal definition fits in with most on this blog. That is SF, should be fiction strongly based on science. There should be no limit to the progressiveness of science that is explored. Last time I checked science and God(s) are dual opposites in much of literature. John W. Campbell, responsible for shaping the Golden Age of Science Fiction defined SF "To be science fiction, not fantasy, an honest effort at prophetic extrapolation from the known must be made". I feel BSG fails this test. Others may argue otherwise, but it makes me strongly question whether I should invest my time in 'Plan' and 'Caprica'. BSG writers have free reign to give us another great build up, only have some deity intervene to solve all the plot holes after we invested "X" number of years in another series. I guess we were told the truth about BSG's intentions early on, but if you were like me, denied it. When Baltar asked Six who she was, her response "I am a messenger of God". I never took that literally until the season finale.

Writer Ronald D Moore essentially wanted to wrap up the whole series with his heavy handed religious beliefs;
"Mathematics," Six Angel replies. "Law of averages. Let a complex system repeat itself long enough and eventually something surprising might occur. That too is in God's plan."
"You know it doesn't like that name," says Baltar Angel. FYI: That was writer Ronald Moore holding the magazine on Mitochondria Eve. As if saying its possible we are descendents of Hera. Don't examine this too much because you will realize to make this true all the 38,000 members left could not have more children aka DNA spread through our genes then the descendants of Hera. Unless all the colonists were Cylons there is no strong linkage to our origin.

Siderite said...

Of course I believed the 6 in the head of crazy Gaius was a messenger of God just as much as I would have believed any other serial killer explaining he is the hand of some deity.

And I believe Campbell was referring to the prophecy of future based on past, not religious prophecy based on hallucinogenic cancer drugs.

It's funny. Just before watching the end of the series I played Battlestar Galactica the board game. I didn't expect it to be much, but I had a lot of fun. Then I watched the series and got completely deflated.

It's like Lost infested all possible decent sci-fi shows of this decade. Even before that there was another show made from "a vision" that failed almost as miserably in the end: Babylon 5.

I wish I wouldn't suck at writing, because the saying is correct: you want to do something right, you've got to do it yourself!

Anonymous said...

How to say: the bonk was not enough? Say it like: BS (from bull-shit?)

Anyway. I've stoped watching the BS way back... after mid season 3. It was sooo obvious it will be a stupid money-making without any idea on the background.

Stupid! Idiotic... no brain involved.

Ubi ... or not be ...

Anonymous said...

Indeed, the finale was idiotic.

But, then, the original series ended in much the same chaotic/idiotic mess. In fact, the storylines of it's finale(s) had much of the same basis in religion and forebearers of civilization.

Funny that it took 4 years of the new series to wash away all the bad feelings I had of the original series... only to have them all come flooding back in the last 2 hours of the new.