Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Microsoft SQL Server table partitioning

Tonight I went to an ADCES presentation about SQL table partitioning, a concept that allows for a lot of flexibility while preserving the same basic interface for a table one would use for a simpler and less scalable application. The talk was very professionally held by Bogdan Sahlean and you should have been there to see it :)

He talked about how one can create filegroups on which a table can be split into as many partitions as needed. He then demonstrated the concept of partition switching, which means swapping two tables without overhead, just via metadata, and, used in the context of partitions, the possibility to create a staging table, do stuff on it, then just swap it with a partition with no downtime. The SQL scripts used in the demo can be found on Sahlean's blog. This technology exists since SQL Server 2005, it's not something terribly new, and features with similar but limited functionality existed since SQL Server 2000. Basically the data in a table can be organized in separate buckets and one can even put each partition on a different drive for extra speed.

Things I've found interesting, in no particular order:
  • Best practice: create custom filegroups for databases and put objects in them, rather than in the primary (default) filegroup. Reason: each filegroup is restored separately,
    with the primary being the first and the one the database restore waits for to call a database as online. That means one can quickly restore the important data and see the db online, while the less accessed or less important data, like archive info, loaded afterwards.
  • Using constraints with CHECK on tables is useful in so many ways. For example, even since SQL Server 2000, one could create tables on different databases, even different servers, and if they are marked with not overlapping checks, one can not only create a view that combines all data with UNION ALL, but also insert into the view. The server will know which tables, databases and servers to connect to. Also, useful in the partition presentation.
  • CREATE INDEX with a DROP_EXISTING hint to quickly recreate or alter clustered indexes. With DROP_EXISTING, you save one complete cycle of dropping and recreating nonclustered indexes. Also, if specifying a different filegroup, you are effectively moving the data in a table from a filegroup to another.
  • Finally, the SWITCH TO partition switching can be used to quickly swap two tables, since from Sql Server 2005 all tables are considered partitioned, with regular ones just having one partition. So one creates a table identical in structure with another, does whatever with it, then just uses something like this: ALTER TABLE Orders SWITCH PARTITION 1 TO OrdersHistory PARTITION 1; to swap them out, with minimal overhang.

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